Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 10


Converting Your Design into Embroidery

To Enlarge the Design
I am afraid that the technique explained on page 41 completely flummoxed me so I decided to go along to our local photocopy shop and ask them to enlarge my image from A3 to A1.
I am currently favouring Spiralling out of Control as I love the richness of the colours and the tonal variances. I think the backing papers present  an opportunity to create interesting embroidery and manipulation, and the foreground suggests areas of texture.
I am aware that this may well change once the revered teacher has had a look at this and so reserve judgement.

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 9


Decorative papers

Colour Scheme
Before putting together a range of decorated papers I had to decide on a colour scheme. I had already chosen a tetrad of colours in chapter 2 which were very much influenced by the Bee-eater and so decided to stick with this. This colour range already included complementary colours and I expanded on this with light and dark tones.



















Colour Symbolism
I gave some thought to the symbolic meaning of colour in general and in relation to my conservation theme and came up with the following list.
Blue – Airy, Coldness, Distance, Eternity, Fresh, Grief, Sky, Tranquil.                    
Green – Calm, Hope, Jealousy, Nature, Peace, Reassured, Relaxed, Tranquility.
Orange – Adventurous, Fun.                                
Purple – Artistic, Elegant, Imaginative, Intuitive, Sophisticated.
Yellow – Brightness, Cowardice, Energy, Treason, Warmth.

Decorated Papers
I decorated a range of papers in my chosen colour scheme with an emphasis on achieving tonal variation. I used a number of different mediums and techniques.
Orange (left to right)
– 80gms paper and acrylic ink orange wash applied and allowed to dry. Spirals made with candle wax and then a brusho orange wash applied and while wet acrylic ink white dropped and spritzed with water.
– Tissue crumpled and an acrylic ink orange wash applied.
– 80gms paper with texture paste applied and allowed to dry. Then a brusho orange wash applied.
– 80gms paper with a candle wax rubbing over plastic mesh.  Then a brusho orange wash applied.
– 80gms paper PVA glue applied and while wet scrunched tissue paper applied to the glue surface. When dry rolled flat and then a brusho orange wash applied.















Blue (left to right)
– Tissue paper with a poster paint blue wash applied. When dry a bubble wrap monoprint applied with brusho ultramarine.
– 80gms paper poster paint blue mark from tissue (under the tissue when painted in no.1) and allowed to dry. Then a bubble wrap monoprint applied with brusho ultramarine.
– 80gms paper with a brusho ultramarine wash and stripes painted. While wet brusho purple dry sprinkled.
– Tissue paper with candle wax marks and a brusho ultramarine wash. While wet brusho white on cling film applied as monoprint.
– 80gms paper with a candle wax rubbing over plastic mesh. Then a brusho ultramarine and white wash applied.
– 80gms paper with a brusho ultramarine wash applied. While wet acrylic ink white on cling film applied as a monoprint.












Turquoise (left to right)
– 80gms paper laid on top of a string frottage and then a candle wax rubbing taken. Then brusho blue, yellow and white applied with a brush.
– Tissue paper with a brusho blue, yellow and white wash.
– 80gms paper with a brusho blue, white and hint of yellow wash applied and then sponge stamped.
– 80gms paper with a brusho blue, white and hint of yellow wash applied. While wet brusho white on cling film applied as a monoprint.
– 80gms paper with acrylic ink turquoise dropped onto the surface and then spread using a toothbrush.















Yellow (left to right)
– 80gms paper with an acrylic ink yellow monoprint. When dry a poster paint yellow wash applied.
– Tissue paper scrunched and an acrylic ink yellow wash applied. When dry randomly torn up and applied to the glued surface of 80gms paper. When dry rolled flat and an acrylic ink yellow wash applied.
– 80gms paper with a design painted in masking fluid and allowed to dry. A poster paint yellow with a hint of black sponged onto the surface. When dry the masking fluid is rubbed away.
– Tissue paper scrunched with poster paint yellow wash applied.














Purple (left to right)
– 80gms paper with thread spirals lightly glued in place. Then a brusho ultramarine, white and red wash applied. When dry the thread is removed.
– Tissue paper with a brusho ultramarine and red wash applied. When dry a poster paint blue, red and hint of white monoprint applied with bubble wrap.
– 80gms paper with a design painted in masking fluid and allowed to dry. Poster paint blue and red applied with a brush. When dry the masking fluid is rubbed away.
– 80gms paper laid on top of a string frottage and then a candle wax rubbing taken. Then poster paint blue, red and a hint of white applied with a brush.
















Green (left to right)
– 80gms paper with brusho yellow and blue applied using a toothbrush.
– 80gms paper with a brusho yellow and blue wash applied. While wet marks applied using a toothbrush.






















Designs in Full Colour
Looking at the designs I produced in chapter 8 I decided to convert three into full colour using my decorated papers.

Spiralling out of Control – this phrase was used in connection with bird trapping but it can also be related to the frenzied way in which swarms of birds arrive and fill the skies. They have travelled long distances using sonar and radar and drop down from the sky with a common aim and goal, to rest and breed.
I produced the foreground piece using purple to cut the spiral which I laid on a square of blue. I then divided this into equal width strips and re-arranged the pieces on a backing made up of three papers; purple widest, blue purple middle width and blue narrowest. I re-arranged the strips so as to show a progression of flock size from dense to sparse as they soar. I also wanted to create a feeling of direction so I rotated the strips slightly to make them look like they were moving from earth of sky.



























Flight Path – migratory birds follow the same flight path and it is a delight twice a year to hear the familiar sound of the Bee-eater arrive, this is followed by the flashes of colour as the flocks glide and ride the thermals. The colour scheme used is influenced by the Bee-eater.
I produced the foreground piece using strips of paper cut from blue, turquoise , yellow and green. I arranged the strips on a square of orange and then cut this up using a rough fibonacci sequence. I wanted to show the erratic nature of the Bee-eater, some arriving solo and others in great quantities. The pieces were re-arranged on a blue backing paper produced using the rubbing method on plastic mesh. This I felt gave a close image to netting and represented the danger these birds faced.



























Migratory Hot Spot – Cyprus is a migratory hot spot with many species of birds arriving in flocks.
The idea of this design is to represent groups of migratory birds all with the same aim and goal, to reach the core. I produced the foreground design using orange paper which I tore to create the shape and then separated each section. These pieces were arranged on a backing of blue/turquoise paper to represent earth.  The introduction of a sliver of colour was to suggest the variety of bird life arriving. 


























One I produced earlier - I started with a colour scheme of yellow and green which when finished I really didn't like so I decided to try again.




Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 8 Section 2


Research for Conservation Theme Section 2

The Trapping of Migrant Birds in Cyprus

The geographical position of the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean gives it special importance as a stopping place for millions of migrant birds moving between Africa, Europe and western Asia each year. During the northward migration in Spring, and the southward movement in the Autumn, huge numbers of birds of almost 300 different species use Cyprus as a stepping-stone during their arduous flights across the Mediterranean. Because of the morphology of the island, the migrants tend to ‘funnel’ into certain areas, making them extremely vulnerable to human interference.
Although Cyprus has laws forbidding the trapping of birds, large numbers of trappers act in breach of the law causing death to millions of migrants annually by the use of illegal lime-sticking (Lime-sticks are twigs, about 50-70cm long, which are covered in extremely sticky 'glue' made by boiling up the fruit of the Syrian plum-tree and mixing it with honey and chemicals. These sticks are placed in bushes, or sometimes inserted into the ends of bamboo poles, to provide very inviting perches for birds) and mist-netting (Mist nets are used by ornithologists and bat biologists to capture wild birds and bats for banding or other research projects. Mist nets are typically made of nylon or polyester mesh suspended between two poles, resembling a volley ball net).
The birds are driven towards the lime-sticks and nets in the early morning by the trappers shouting and throwing stones into the bushes to flush the birds out. A newer, and even more lethal method, involves the use of tape-recorded birdsong to attract the migrants to their deaths. The use of such recordings is illegal, but is becoming increasingly widespread.
The trapped birds are usually killed, the exception being any particularly exotic species which might be retained alive for the caged bird trade. Unwanted species are simply killed and discarded, the remainder are killed and sold as ‘ambellopoulia’, a high-priced delicacy on the island. The birds are pickled or grilled, and sold in tavernas. 


Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 8 Section 1


Research for Conservation Theme Section 1

The conservation theme I have chosen is the Bird Migration and Trapping in Cyprus. Please see Chapter 8 Research for Conservation Theme Section 2 for background information and data on this subject.

Visual Reference
The visual references I have collected are images of birds, methods of trapping, migratory maps and data relating to anti trapping activity.
Image 1 – From top left clockwise – Hoopoe Feather, Hoopoe caught in a mist-net, Syrian plum tree, Bird caught in a net, Mist-nets, Bird caught on a lime-stick.
Image 2 – From top left clockwise – Map of Cyprus, Migratory map of world, Bird Watch Cyprus poster, Migratory map Eastern Mediterranean.
Image 3 – From top left clockwise – Bee-eater, European Roller, Cyprus Wheatear, Flocks of migratory birds, Hoopoe, Cyprus Warbler, Black Cap.





















Verbal Information
I wrote a list of words and phrases that I felt were pertinent to the theme of bird trapping, migration and bird behaviour. I used some of these words to explore design themes involving shapes and composition.
Bird Trapping – Becoming Increasingly Widespread ; Causing Death ; Cull ; Decline ; Delicacy ; Driven Towards ; Endangered ; Extremely Vulnerable ; Forbidding ; Trapping ; Funnel Into ; Illegal ; Indiscriminate ; Massacre ; Predation ; Protection ; Spiralled Out Of Control ; Trapped ; Vulnerable.
Bird Migration – Autumn ; Breeding Ground ; Common Aim ; Core ; Direction ; Echo ; Flight Path ; Goal ; Intention ; Journeys End ; Magnetic Field ; Migration Hot-spot ; Navigation ; North ; Purpose ; Radar ; Sonar ; South ; Spring ; Swarms ; Tired ; Weary.
Bird Behaviour – Activity ; Arduous ; Birds of a Feather Stick Together ; Bird Song ; Feathered Friend ; Flocks ; Formation ; Gliding ; Movement ; Poetry.

Drawings
I made drawings in my sketch book of some of the visual information I collected to record shapes, textures, patterns and colour.
Image 4A – Bee-eater brilliant colours; orange underwing, distinct v shape on back, contrasting plumage, long central tail feathers and pointed wings. Flight is buoyant and easy, soaring and sailing down, riding the thermals. Perched on wires and bare branches in groups. The sounds are a happy cheery “chirrup”.
Image 4B – Hoopoe Feather.
Image 5A – Mist-nets; nylon or polyester mesh suspended between two poles.
Image 5B – Hoopoe flight is jerky and bouncing with many changes of direction. Dazzling barred wing pattern, long bill, head shape, raised chest and long tail. Slightly down curved bill is used for dragging grubs from the ground. Call is a hollow “poop-oop-oop-oop”.























Design Exercise
I selected a few words and formed simple compositions from small pieces of black paper.

Compositions Black Paper
Image 6A – Bend : Conflicting : Confused : Separated           
Image 6B – Compressed : Crushed : Enclosed : Imprisoned 
Image 6C – Combined : Entwined : Enveloped : Married        
Image 6D – Peaceful : Quiet : Restful : Gentle
Image 6E – Controlled : Fast : Frenzied : Vigorous
Image 6F – Expelled : Rhythmical : Soft : Suppressed

























Compositions Relating to Conservation Theme Black and Coloured Paper
Image 7A and 7B – Formation : Direction : Poetry
Image 7C and 7D – Protection : Guarded : Enclosed
Image 8A and 8B – Spiralling out of Control : Fast : Disaster  : Goal
Image 8C and 8D – Migration Hot Spot : Core : Magnet : Common Aim
Image 9A and 9B – Flight Path : Direction : Navigation : Flock : Swarm
Image 9C and 9D – Trapped : Death : Fear
Image 10A and 10B – Birds of a Feather : Unity : Stuck
Image 10C and 10D – Feathered Friend : Joined : Support





Wednesday, 8 March 2017

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 7


Use of Dissolvable Fabrics

Technical Samples Using One Type of Stitch Method
I had available four types of dissolvable fabric to experiment with. I cut a square of each sufficiently large enough in size to fit the smallest hoop and free motion stitched 3cm squares of each.
Image 1A – Heavy weight Romeo film – Hooped quite tightly but needed care when stitching as the film could easily tear. Need to be held under water for some time to wash away the film. Retained its shape and size.
Image 1B – Madeira Avalon film – Hooped well but even more care needed to avoid tearing when stitched. It shrank a little when washed.
Image 1C – Madeira Avalon Plus non-woven – This was more like sewing fabric and it washed away cleanly whilst retaining its size and shape.
Image 1D – Solufleece non-woven – Preformed as with above and is my choice to proceed with as it’s the one I have most of.

Samples of Soluble Lace Using Different Stitch Methods
Using solufleece hooped I stitched a series of 3cm square samples (which all pretty much kept their shape) as follows:-
Image 1E – Normal stitching, very dense effect, only in one direction and zigzag stitch.
Image 1F – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, in opposite directions and straight stitch.
Image 1G – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very open effect, in opposite directions and cable stitch.
Image 1H – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very open effect, in opposite directions and whip stitch.
Image 1I – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very dense effect, only in one direction, in curved shapes and whip stitch.
Image 1J – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very open effect, in opposite directions, in curved shapes and whip stitch.
Image 1K – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very dense effect, only in one direction and zigzag stitch.
Image 1L – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very dense effect, only in one direction and cable stitch.
Image 1M – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, very open effect, in opposite directions and straight stitch metallic thread.
Image 1N – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, in curved shapes, very open effect, in opposite directions and straight stitch metallic thread.
Image 1O – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, straight stitch, very open effect, in opposite directions and with trapped bits.
Image 1P – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, straight stitch, very open effect, in opposite directions and with trapped bits.

Image 2 – Free stitchery using embroidery foot with feed teeth out of action, straight stitch, very dense effect, in curved shapes. The solufleece was only partially washed away and the fabric was draped over a tube shape, secured with a rubber band and left to dry creating a three dimensional shape.

Soluble Lace Samples Based on Sea and Sky Drawings
Using solufleece hooped I stitched a series of samples based on some of my drawings in chapter 1 as follows:-
1Q - Limassol Beach Row 1 Middle Sgrafitto – Whip stitch in one direction using thread and then curved cable stitch in the opposite direction.
1R - Red Shank Waiting for the Ebb Row 2 Left Marks – Straight stitch diagonal using thread and then whip stitch random direction.
1S - Reef Bass and Sand Eels Row 2 Left Marks – Whip stitch in tight coils using thread and then inner coils of wool.
1T - Morning on the Seine IV Row 1 Middle Marks – Straight stitch swirls using two different coloured threads.
1U - Morning on the Seine IV Row 1 Right Marks – Normal stitching zigzag over trapped fabric.
1V - Limassol Beach Row 2 Middle Marks – Straight stitch in blocks leaving thread tails over trapped perle cotton threads.

Once the stitching was completed I cut away the excess soluble fabric and pinned the samples to a sheet of polystyrene. I then ran water over the pinned samplers and agitated them lightly to wash away the fabric. The exception to this is the 3 dimensional piece which I only partially washed away the fabric.