Monday, 24 April 2017

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Administration


Storage of Work, Materials, Tools and Equipment
Item
Storage Place
Ideal Conditions
Design Work in Progress.
Either pinned to a cork board or displayed on a shelf in my workroom. The workroom has blackout blinds and a lockable door.
Away from sun, liquids, dust, children, pets.
Completed Design Work.
Wrapped in acid free tissue stored either flat or in a large box in a cupboard in my workroom.
Keep flat and wrap in acid free tissue paper.
Papers for Design Work.
Stored flat in a cupboard in my workroom.
Same as above.
Embroidery Work in Progress.
Either pinned to a cork board or displayed on a shelf in my workroom. The workroom has blackout blinds and a lockable door.
Accessible to continuous work, away from usual hazards.
Completed Embroidery.
Wrapped in acid free tissue stored either flat or in a large box in a cupboard in my workroom.
Wrap in acid free tissue paper.
Inks and Paints for Design Work.
Stored in plastic airtight box on a shelf in my workroom.
Upright, lids secure: cool dark conditions.
Other Items like Glue, Bleach, Sprays.
Stored in plastic airtight box on a shelf in my workroom or in a box under the bed settee in my workroom.
As above, secure from children and pets.
Fabrics.
Folded flat, some wrapped in acid free tissue. Stored in a cupboard in my workroom.
Dry, away from sun. Flat or rolled in colour or fibre order. Acid free tissue paper.
Threads.
Sorted by colour and stored in boxes on a shelf in my workroom.
Dry, away from sun, untangled and in colour and/or type order.
Beads, Metal Threads etc.
Sorted in colour and size and stored in boxes on a shelf in my workroom.
In acid free tissue, not plastic bags.
Dyes, Paints etc.
Stored in plastic airtight box on a shelf in my workroom or in a box under the bed settee in my workroom.
Lids secure, cool temperature. Enclosed container.
Sewing Machine.
The room temperature and humidity control is difficult in the summer. The machine is kept up-right in working position.
Normal room temperature and humidity. Keep up-right in working position for easy-use.
Other Electrical Equipment.
Mostly stored on shelves in my workroom with flex wound around the item.
Dry place with flex lightly wound. Stored away only when cold.

Health and Safety Module 6
Bleach
·         Do not eat, drink, smoke, make up or store food in the area containing chemicals.
·         Wash hands, arms and face immediately after using the chemicals.
·         Keep the floor clean, the passageway clear and the area well ventilated
·         Understand the properties of the chemicals being used.
·         Follow the instructions and safety measures as recommended by the product manufacturer.
·         Containers must be properly labelled and covered securely.
·         Store the chemical agents in a shaded, cool, dry and well ventilated place.
·         Do not place incompatible materials together.
·         Do not dispose of chemical agents improperly.
·         Use personal protective equipment properly.

Paints and Dyes
  • Wear rubber gloves to avoid staining and allergic reaction.
  • Wear an apron to protect clothing.
  • Protect work surfaces.
  • When opening dye container avoid inhalation of the paint powder.
  • Keep away from food preparation areas.
  • Dispose of unwanted liquid paints down the sink while running the tap.
  • If storing unused paints do so in a plastic container.
  • Take care when mixing powders into solutions to minimise inhalation of dust from powdered paints.
  • Wear a mask.
  • Work away from draughts and switch off fans and air conditioning.

Soldering Iron
  • Never leave a heat gun unattended. This is to ensure no-one gets burned when unsupervised.
  • Never leave a heat gun within reach of children or pets who risk knocking it over and injuring themselves.
  • Never put your heat gun in water.
  • Do not unplug the heat gun by pulling on the cord.
  • Always unplug your heat gun before leaving it or cleaning it.
  • Use a stand to keep safe.Take care when heating and melting materials to minimise inhalation of fumes.
  • Work in a well ventilated place such as a window.

Costings to Produce Assessment Piece Module 6
Total                                                                                     
Solufleece                                                                             1.30
Cotton                                                                                   2.00
Calico                                                                                    2.00
Muslin                                                                                   2.00
Scrim                                                                                     2.00
Felt                                                                                        4.00
Threads                                                                                 2.50
Shirring Elastic                                                                     1.00
Dyes and Paints                                                                    5.00
Dowel                                                                                   1.50

Total                                                                                    23.30

Timings Module 6
Date when module work was started 30th January 2017 completed 24th April 2017
Date when embroidered item was started 11th April 2017 completed 23rd April 2017

Total number of hours spent working on Module 6 = 258.0
Total number of hours spent working on Chapter 11 = 51.5

Evaluation of Assessment Piece Module 6
The completed assessment piece for Module Six is a Wall Hanging based on the conservation theme Bird Migration and Trapping in Cyprus.

How do you feel about the resulting conclusion?
I am very pleased with the outcome. I feel I have managed to replicate the paper design in stitch well and thoroughly enjoyed experimenting with the various techniques used. The outcome of the spiral was particularly pleasing as I wanted to create something which could stand alone but was also translucent enough so as not to obscure the backing.

Is it fit for purpose – give reasons?
The finished Wall Hanging was photographed hanging on a nail in my lounge and so I can say it  is fit for purpose.

If you were to make it again, what changes would you make to the way you designed it and way you made it?
Upon completion of the base of the Wall Hanging (before attaching the spiral sections) I felt that it could stand alone as a design and was tempted to leave it like that. However the spiral sections are integral to the design and I feel finish it off beautifully.

Me dyeing fabric

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 12


Barbara Lee Smith – chose to pursue fine art with an emphasis on mixed media/textiles, receiving an MFA in 1978 and honours as a University Scholar.
She teaches workshops for adults and participates in residencies all over the world. A personal goal has been to help the field of textiles be recognized as a major art form and to see that those who use fibre as their primary medium are recognized within the larger world of art.
She finds it essential to honour the land and sea as we know it - the rhythms of nature - but in new and less representational ways. Her primary aim is to express her awe at the abundance of nature and also to influence minds and hearts to remember what we have in order to sustain it for the future.
She has been honoured for her work by local Art Commission’s Career Award, named an honorary member of the Embroiderers' Guild of England, as well as Distinguished Resident by the Ragdale Foundation.

Marshland Reflections, acrylic on stitched synthetic material, 42 x 49.5in

Rock, Sea, Air II, acrylic on stitched synthetic material, 18.5 x 28in

Whitecaps, painted printed fused and stitched mixed media textile 69 x 144in


Jae Maries – main theme since graduating from Reading University (BA Hons Fine Art) has been to represent people in everyday situations. She would often make use of her thumb-nail sketches as inspiration which were then developed into life-size wall-hung textile pieces.
More recently however, Jae’s work has changed direction and she is creating panels using her daily Visual Diaries as her resource. The marks, symbols and relevant studio fragments represent the events, feelings and actions that impact on Jae in her everyday life.
She trained as an oil painter and moved into stitched textiles later in her career with the intention of combining textured stitched surfaces with painted fabric sections. The challenge of working simultaneously with oil painted surfaces and fabric is technically stretching but she enjoys the contrast between the spontaneity of the brush stroke and the hands-on tactile approach that comes with dyeing, manipulating and stitching into fabric.
As well as being an artist, Jae is an internationally recognized lecturer and tutor in creative textiles and has taught in Australia and USA. She has also exhibited widely, in Japan, Israel, USA and Switzerland as well as the UK.
She is an exhibiting member of 62 Group of Textile Artists (taking over the Chair in December 2009) and Contextus.

Gathering

Bar Chat

Chinese Junks


Wendy Dolan – describes herself as a textile artist who uses fabrics and threads to create textured designs. She specialises in freehand machine embroidery and creative stitching techniques. She records her ideas with sketch, torn paper collage and on camera.
Her inspiration comes from the South Downs close to where she lives. The landscape provides a constant source of inspiration for her stitched textile designs.  Her current theme ‘A Sense of Place’ records memorable journeys and locations, using fabric, stitch and texture. Architectural structures, textures, and patterns also provide a wealth of ideas which she enjoys exploring.
She is qualified with a B.Ed. Degree and a Diploma in Creative Embroidery and exhibits and sells her work nationwide. She is a Fellow of The Society of Designer Craftsmen, The Sussex Guild of Designers and Makers, The Embroiderers’ Guild and is on the Crafts Council Makers’ Index.
I had the pleasure of attending a course run by Wendy at the Knitting and Stitching Show which I thoroughly enjoyed and it has encouraged me to pursue free motion stitching with a bit more confidence.

Across the Downs

End of Summer

Escarpment

Poppy Field

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 11


Make Your Wall Hanging

Interpreting Log Cabin Design
Method 6 – My interpretation of the log cabin design is to start with a base of fabric on the reverse of which trace the design. On the top side of the fabric adhere painted bondaweb and then place another piece of fabric on top of this. With the base fabric reverse side upper most in the machine, stitch areas of the design through both fabrics, as densely as possible.  Cut away areas of the second piece of fabric which haven’t been stitched and then place a third piece of fabric on top.  Again with the base fabric reverse side upper most in the machine, stitch areas of the design through all three fabrics, as densely as possible. The sample shown in Image 1 uses two fabrics.



Converting a Paper Design into Embroidered Techniques
From the samplers I produced in chapter 10 I decided to use 5B earth, 6A sea and 7B sky. I felt these best represented the decorated papers and the overall theme. The common factors throughout are cotton, cotton scrim, cotton muslin and cotton calico as well as free motion stitchery and zigzag stitch.  
To aid in converting the design I used the enlarged A1 design and the pattern pieces produced in chapter 10. I decided that the design would be made up of three sections and each section would be sewn separately and then sewn to a backing fabric of calico. The calico will be 2 cm shorter and narrower enabling the chosen edge finish method described further down.

Earth – Pattern Piece Earth – For the base I used a cotton fabric which I had previously dyed pink. This was rubbed with a wax candle over a string design and then the cotton was given a blue wash using Brusho to bring the colour nearer mauve/purple. The curving undulating lines were created using two types of fabric 1. Scrim painted with Brusho blue/purple cut up into strips and machine sewn down the centre with a twin needle. The strips were then gathered lightly, the edges frayed and tacked to the cotton frottage base 2. Muslin previously dyed pink which was rubbed with a wax candle over a string design and the muslin was then given a blue wash using Brusho to bring the colour nearer mauve/purple. This was cut up into strips and machine sewn down the centre with a twin needle. The strips were then gathered lightly, the edges frayed and tacked to the cotton frottage base. The cotton frottage base with the strips tacked in place was then machine sewn to the lower section of the calico backing. The machine sewing was done along each tacked strip with a wide zigzag whip stitch.

Sea – Pattern Piece Sea – For the base I used a cotton fabric which I had previously dyed blue. I then cut strips of varied length and width from cotton, muslin, calico and scrim which had been previously dyed varying shades of blue. I hand stitched and gathered the strips varying the tightness of the gathers and leaving the edges rough and frayed in places. These were then tacked to the cotton base leaving areas of the base fabric visible. Before doing this I played around with the arrangement of the strips. I wanted to achieve an element of randomness in the colour placement whilst ensuring a connectivity of colour between the earth and sky. The base with the strips tacked in place was then machine sewn to the middle section of the calico backing. The machine sewing was done from top to bottom in wavy line of zigzag whip stitch.

Sky – Pattern Piece Sky – For the base I used a piece of cotton fabric. To this I tacked dyed cotton damask which had been machine stitched using shirring elastic in the bobbin. The stitching is done in a zigzag formation to create the pockets. The base with the shirred fabric tacked in place was then stitched to the top section of the calico backing. The edge which connects to the sea horizon is left un-sewn to create a wavy effect.

Flock and Formation – Pattern Piece Flock and Formation – For the spiral I used scrim painted with Brusho blue/purple. I sandwiched the scrim between two sheets of solufleece. On the top sheet of solufleece I traced the whole spiral design and hooped all three layers. I then free motion whip stitched following the traced spiral design. I pinned the completed piece to polystyrene and washed the solufleece away, but not completely so as to stiffen the fabric when dry. I needed the stitched fabric to have substance so that when cut up into the four sections it would hold its shape and enable me to tack it to the base of the wall hanging. When I lay the sections on the base of the wall hanging I found that the top two which overlapped sky and sea disappeared into the background as the colours were too similar. To help the spiral stand out more I tacked hand dyed pink selvage to the underside, this helped to lift the design from the base. 

Finishing off Edges
The top, bottom and side edges were turned and tacked to the calico backing leaving the edges of the fabric strips to protrude. A felt backing was tacked to the calico on the reverse of the wall hanging to cover the turned hem and stitching. 

Methods of Hanging
Before attaching the felt to the top of the calico backing six tabs made from hand dyed selvage were sewn in place. These were looped around the woven wooden dowels and again sewn to the calico backing.  The three wooden dowels were woven together using hand dyed selvage. It was woven in a way so as to create a zigzag effect and the colour of the selvage was to create a continuation of the sky.

The image I have shown are as follows:-
Image 2 – Stitched Wall Hanging without spirals added.
Image 3 – Completed Wall Hanging.
Image 4 – Close up of completed Wall Hanging.
Image 5 – Close up of completed Wall Hanging.
Image 6 – Close up of completed Wall Hanging.
Image 7 – Reverse of completed Wall Hanging.








The finished size is 84.0 cm by 52.0 cm.
My choice of place to hang would be the head office of Bird Life Cyprus.

Presentation of Supporting Work
Composite Sheet – For the composite sheet I used a piece of adhesive backed pelmet lining which had been painted with a wash of Brusho blue/purple. To this I adhered the following:-
A3 size full colour design.
Stitched samplers sky, sea, earth and spiral.
Sampler of wooden dowel hanging method.
Decorated papers.
Hand drawn images of Hoopoe and Bee-Eater.
I then adhered a 50.0 cm by 70.0 cm size piece of 160gms card to the underside of the pelmet lining to add strength.








Saturday, 8 April 2017

Module Six ‘Creative Conservation’ Chapter 10–Part 2


Enlarged Design and Pattern Pieces
I have decided to work with Spiralling out of Control – the three segments of the design background suggest earth, sea and sky. The four overlaid panels suggest the flocks of birds and in particular the flight formation as they soar from earth to sky.
Working with my enlarged full colour A1 design I traced the outline shape of each area to produce a pattern piece (see Image 1). Armed with the pattern pieces, the A3 design, the full colour A1copy and the fabric manipulation samples form module 5 and module 6 I set about planning the next stages.


Translate Each Decorated Paper into a Richly Embroidered Surface
The design was made up of three decorated papers and my observations of these are as follows:-
Image 2 – The colour is somewhere between purple and mauve with patches of light and dark tone. The marks form short zigzag linear blocks and long curving lines.


Image 3 – The colour is a tonal variation of blues with some purple patches. The marks form wide stripes with dense mottled patches randomly scattered.


Image 4 – The colour is blue with patches of white. The marks form translucent patchy blocks randomly scattered.


To convert these papers into stitch and fabric manipulation I experimented with a number of techniques as follows:-
Image 5 – The decorated paper featured in image 2 represents the earth in my design, the marks suggested textural undulations and linear patchy areas as well as some tonal variances.
            Sampler 5A – Dyed pink cotton with a blue acrylic wash to get closer to the purple. Bondaweb painted with a purple acrylic wash and when dry ironed to the muslin. In some areas more than one layer adhered. This is then backed by cotton and free motion stitched into from the reverse with a purple cotton perle no.5 in the bobbin and white polyester thread on top to create a whip and cable stitch. Slits were cut in the cotton backing and padded with polyester wadding.
            Sampler 5B – Dyed pink muslin with a blue acrylic wash to get closer to the purple. Strips of space dyed scrim machine sewn with a zigzag stitch and then gathered. The gathered strips are then free motion whip stitched to the muslin in a curving fashion with a zigzag stitch.
            Sampler 5C – Pink muslin rubbed with a candle over a design created with string and card. The muslin is then painted with a blue acrylic wash to get closer to the purple and highlight the wax resist. This is then backed by polyester wadding and cotton and free motion stitched into from the reverse with a purple cotton perle no.5 in the bobbin and white polyester thread on top to create whip and cable stitch wadded quilting design.


Image 6 – The decorated paper featured in image 3 represents the sea in my design, the marks suggested a washy tonal effect with dense slanting zigzag patches.
            Sampler 6A – Strips of dyed and painted muslin, scrim and calico in various tones of blue, machine gathered and tacked to a cotton backing. This was then free motion whip stitched using embroidery thread 40 and a zigzag stitch.
            Sampler 6B – Polyester lining painted with a blue acrylic wash and some dabs of red added to make purple patches, this is then heat treated to pucker the fabric. The painted fabric is backed by various layers of polyester wadding and cotton and then free motion whip stitched using embroidery thread 40 and a zigzag stitch.
            Sampler 6C – Dyed muslin overlaid with fabric scraps and free motion whip stitched using embroidery thread 40.



Image 7 – The decorated paper featured in image 4 represented the sky in my design, the marks suggested translucent textural patches.
            Sampler 7A – Dyed cotton damask free motion stitched using cord quilting with the reverse side up.
            Sampler 7B – Dyed cotton damask free motion stitched using shirring elastic in the bobbin. The stitching is done in a zigzag formation to create the pockets.
            Sampler 7C – Dyed cotton damask free motion whip stitched and then a hand stitched running stitch to create gathers.


 Image 8 – These are the samplers I rejected but I thought I would feature them for interest.
            A – Painted webbing ironed to cotton and zigzag stitched.
            B – Free motion whip and cable stitch on a backing of calico.
            C – Painted scrim free motion whip stitched.
            D – Cotton machine stitched, gathered and free motion stitch whip stitched.
            E – Solufleece free motion whip and cable stitched and fabric washed away.
            F – Painted bondaweb, ironed onto cotton and free motion whip stitched.
            G – Dyed muslin free motion cable stitch.
H – Painted bondaweb, ironed onto cotton backed by polyester wadding and cotton, free motion stitched and then fabric cut away.


Image 9 and 9A – I knew the panels representing the flocks and formation would prove a challenge. I had in mind words like lacy, see through and transparent for the rectangles representing the flocks and the spiralling formations. To create this I free motion whip stitched spirals onto solufleece. I then stitched this to space dyed scrim around the edges of the spiral and washed the solufleece away. The idea is to cut this into rectangles which will then be stitched to main body.



Image 10 – Returning to my colourful bee-eater I decided to try to produce a stitched version. Using variegated cotton in the colours of the bee-eater and solufleece on which I had drawn the outline of the bird, I free motion stitched the outline and then filled this in with tiny spirals. I washed away the solufleece leaving just a little so that I could shape the wings to create dimension. I am hoping to be able to use this somewhere on the wall hanging but I am concerned that the colours will be too much of a contrast.


Chosen Samplers
I have decided to use sampler 5B earth, 6A sea and 7B sky. I felt these best represented the decorated papers and the overall theme. The common factors throughout are cotton scrim, muslin and calico as well as free motion stitchery and zigzag stitch (see Image 11).